Int’l Film Fest Santiago de Compostela Spain

Annick & Tony: A Talking Portrait Story video featured in 2007 Short Film Market of the  International Short Film Festival Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

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The Annick & Tony: A Talking Portrait Story video was featured in the 2007 Short Film Market of the  International Short Film Festival Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

International Film Festival in Santiago de Compostela

Curtocircuíto – International Film Festival in Santiago de Compostela, started in 2003 and was an initiative created by the City Council, with the intention of promoting filmmaking in the field of short film. Twelve years later, and led by an external team independent from the City Hall, Curtocircuíto  has reached a high national standing, working in direct contact with other European festivals. Short films from around the world compete within the Official Competition, and the Parallel Programmes provide a wide variety of lengths and formats, keeping the contemporary and the risk as references. This is a festival committed to its time, which supports creators, training and integration of citizenship within it. More than being a film festival, with its parallel activities and concerts, Curtocircuíto wants to become a point of entertainment and cultural meeting.

cathedral-of-santiago-de-compostela

The Camino de Santiago, also known by the English names Way of St. James, St. James’s Way, St. James’s Path, St. James’s Trail, Route of Santiago de Compostela, and Road to Santiago, is the name of any of the pilgrimage routes, known as pilgrim ways, to the shrine of the apostle St. James the Great in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia in northwestern Spain, where tradition has it that the remains of the saint are buried. Many follow its routes as a form of spiritual path or retreat for their spiritual growth. It is also popular with hiking and cycling enthusiasts as well as organized tours.

The Way of St. James was one of the most important Christian pilgrimages during the Middle Ages, together with those to Rome and Jerusalem, and a pilgrimage route on which a plenary indulgence could be earned; other major pilgrimage routes include the Via Francigena to Rome and the pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Legend holds that St. James’s remains were carried by boat from Jerusalem to northern Spain, where he was buried in what is now the city of Santiago de Compostela. (The name Santiago is the local Galician evolution of Vulgar Latin Sancti Iacobi, “Saint James”.)

The Way can take one of dozens of pilgrimage routes to Santiago de Compostela. Traditionally, as with most pilgrimages, the Way of Saint James began at one’s home and ended at the pilgrimage site. However, a few of the routes are considered main ones. During the Middle Ages, the route was highly travelled. However, the Black Death, the Protestant Reformation, and political unrest in 16th century Europe led to its decline. By the 1980s, only a few pilgrims per year arrived in Santiago. Later, the route attracted a growing number of modern-day pilgrims from around the globe. In October 1987, the route was declared the first European Cultural Route by the Council of Europe; it was also named one of UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites.

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